The name “fenugreek” or foenum-graecum is Latin name for “Greek hay”. Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) is a plant in the family Fabaceae. It is cultivated worldwide as a semi-arid crop and is frequently used in preparing curry. Fenugreek has a history of being used for medicinal purpose and can even treat diabetes.

Several human intervention trials demonstrated that the antidiabetic effects of fenugreek seeds ameliorate most metabolic symptoms associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes in humans by reducing serum glucose and improving glucose tolerance. Fenugreek is currently available commercially in encapsulated forms and is being prescribed as dietary supplements for the control of hypercholesterolemia and diabetes by practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine.

Fenugreek seeds contain alkaloids, including trigonelline and gentianine. The mechanism is thought to delay gastric emptying, slow carbohydrate absorption and inhibit glucose transport. Fenugreek may also increase the number of insulin receptors in red blood cells and improve glucose utilization in peripheral tissues, thus demonstrating potential anti-diabetes effects both in the pancreas and other sites. The amino acid 4- hydroxyisoleucine, contained in the seeds, may also directly stimulate insulin secretion.

Working in a similar way to the common antidiabetic drug glibenclamide, fenugreek lowers cellular insulin resistance and controls blood glucose homeostasis. It has been shown to lower blood glucose levels of Type II diabetics by as much as 46 percent. It also increases the levels of several important antioxidants and reduces the damaging oxidation of lipids associated with diabetes.

ing in a similar way to the common antidiabetic drug glibenclamide, fenugreek lowers cellular insulin resistance and controls blood glucose homeostasis. It has been shown to lower blood glucose levels of Type II diabetics by as much as 46 percent.

It also increases the levels of several important antioxidants and reduces the damaging oxidation of lipids associated with diabetes.

admin on July 14th 2010 in General